All posts filed under: History of Art

Guide to the BA History of Art Dissertation

My guide to the BA Dissertation

Dissertations can be pretty intimidating for anyone. The fact that this is probably the first ‘big’ essay that you have written, and may even have to write, can also add to that big black cloud that seems to loom and follow over you for your third year. However, the dissertation needn’t be a daunting project at all, and towards the end you may even find it enjoyable! (Some people may completely disagree with that last statement!) I found approaching my dissertation really difficult to begin with. I ended up changing my idea several times in Autumn term. Having completed the Dissertation Portfolio in second year, that really did help. Even though I didn’t end up using my original ideas, just the process of understanding how to research and construct the dissertation was really useful. In fact, my final dissertation idea came about from my Autumn term module ‘Death and Devotion in the Gothic Imagination.’ Having read a lot about the Sainte-Chapelle (and falling in love with it!), I began to look deeper into the scholarship to see …

Medieval Conferences in Paris, December 2014

This December, Paris will host two exciting Medieval conferences, with esteemed historians travelling to the capital to give papers. Not only will these be great opportunities to meet fellow art historians and hear interesting talks, but they are free! I will be attending both, and will blog about the contents of each.   Conférences et colloques Saint-Louis et les arts en Europe, Louvre, 6th December 2014 – 10am – 18pm  http://www.louvre.fr/saint-louis-et-les-arts-en-europe In conjunction with the current exposition at the Conciergerie, on Saturday 6th December, the Louvre will present a conference pertaining the artistic patronage of Saint Louis, and his potential influence and relationships throughout Europe. Many may already be aware of the intense artistic patronage of King Louis IX during his reign, and it is often interpreted that his patronage was a means of asserting political agendas (this is part of what my BA Dissertation argued against). This one day conference is sure to be intriguing, and for those fellow Saint Louis lovers out there like myself, this is a definite conference to attend. Having completed my BA dissertation …

‘Invention and Imagination in British Art and Architecture, 600-1500’, The British Museum London, 30/10/14 – 1/11/14

Tomorrow, a collaborative event organised by the Paul Mellon Centre and The British Museum, will hosting a conference titled ‘Invention and Imagination in British Art and Architecture, 600-1500’. This conference will ‘explore  the ways in which artists and patrons in Britain devised and introduced new or distinctive imagery, styles and techniques, as well as novel approaches to bringing different media together’; and I cannot wait to attend. One aspect of the Medieval period that has interested me for so long are the ways in which the artists and thinkers of the time were concerned with invention and using imagination as a means for expression. Obviously the society that we live in now, and have been living in since the emergence of science and rational is far different from the ones experienced during the Middle Ages. Through exploring the ways in which patronage etc has effected the modes of expression and ways of understanding the world that surrounded them, art and architecture was a means for the Medieval mind to grasp comprehension and order. Another reason why this conference will …

Oxford Post-Graduate Trip

After what feels like a decade away from academia, my mother and I ventured to the quaint city that is Oxford to have a noisy around the University and Colleges. As many may have read throughout my blogging, I am hoping to continue further study after my year in Paris and want to complete a Masters focusing on Medieval History of Art. As I will be away for the next year, I thought it was probably wise to get started in looking at potential universities so that I get a ‘proper’ feel for the place before applying. I have only been to Oxford once, and that was when I was only a small child so my memories of the city are quite limited! The city is beautiful. It shares many similarities with York, which I love. One of the main advantages of the university is that it is spread out throughout the entire city. Oxford truly is the University’s city. I am not saying at all that I did not enjoy the centralised nature of …

J’ai fini!

Wow, I cannot quite believe that I am writing this post. It’s official. Yesterday I graduated from York with a First! I am over the moon! It was such a lovely ceremony, and it was great to see everyone before and after. Despite my gown taking every opportunity to try and wriggle its way off me, I managed to survive the graduate fashion. After the graduation ceremony, the History of Art department hosted a lovely get together with some yummy pastries and drinks! From there, me and my family ventured onto the Minster to take some photos by York’s iconic building. I don’t like the thought of calling myself a graduate now… I am still a student at heart! So now I have a month before I move to Paris for the year, and from there, I plan to begin studying for a Masters in History of Art so do expect more to come from my blog! I hope that everyone had a wonderful day yesterday – everyone looked so lovely, and it was sad not too …

MET: ‘Radiant Light Stained Glass from Canterbury Cathedral’

Between February 25th and May 18th the Cloisters Museum at the MET in New York is hosting an exhibition presenting stained glass from England’s historic Canterbury Cathedral, dating from 1178-80. I find this concept quite unusual I’m not going to lie, as the exhibitions features six Romanesque-period windows that have never left the cathedral since their creation. Bringing stained-glass from the Cathedral to the MET – why when you can just go to Canterbury itself? I guess through bringing the glass over the pond, so to speak, allows more people to see the beauty of Canterbury’s windows. However, I feel that taking such works out of their religious context renders them almost ‘dumb’ in the sense that they’re not functioning in the religious manner that they should be. I guess times have changed so much anyway, that perhaps the religious function of the stained glass windows are becoming more over-looked and less part of their identity. Having studied Canterbury Cathedral last term, I fell in love with it. I have never been there myself, but having seen …

Surviving 48 hour open book exams

48 hour open exams sound tough, and I’m not going to lie, they are incredibly daunting as there is so much time pressure on you to attempt to write two well written essays. However, I think that there are many different things that you can before and during to help ease the pressure and anxiety of the exam process. The following blog post presents many different tips and advice that I have learnt throughout my own experience of completing a 48 hour open exam. If you can think of anything that I have missed, or if you have any tips that you believe should be on here comment below! During term: Note-taking: Try and take the best notes that you can during your seminars/lectures and meetings with your tutors- with history of art, tutors don’t give us the seminar notes like other subjects do, so it’s your responsibility to write everything down – even if you don’t think it’s relevant at the time, it might just be in the future. Try also to make notes …