My guide to the BA Dissertation

My guide to the BA Dissertation

Dissertations can be pretty intimidating for anyone. The fact that this is probably the first ‘big’ essay that you have written, and may even have to write, can also add to that big black cloud that seems to loom and follow over you for your third year. However, check out my list of handy tips which will hopefully make the experience a lot more enjoyable!

Continue reading “My guide to the BA Dissertation”

Medieval Conferences in Paris, December 2014

Sculpture of Saint Louis, photograph taken by myself at the Saint Louis Exhibition
Sculpture of Saint Louis, photograph taken by myself at the Saint Louis Exhibition

This December, Paris will host two exciting Medieval conferences, with esteemed historians travelling to the capital to give papers. Not only will these be great opportunities to meet fellow art historians and hear interesting talks, but they are free! I will be attending both, and will blog about the contents of each. Continue reading “Medieval Conferences in Paris, December 2014”

‘Invention and Imagination in British Art and Architecture, 600-1500’, The British Museum London, 30/10/14 – 1/11/14

A blog post all about a collaborative event organised by the Paul Mellon Centre and The British Museum, will hosting a conference titled ‘Invention and Imagination in British Art and Architecture, 600-1500’. Continue reading “‘Invention and Imagination in British Art and Architecture, 600-1500’, The British Museum London, 30/10/14 – 1/11/14”

Oxford Post-Graduate Trip

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After what feels like a decade away from academia, my mother and I ventured to the quaint city that is Oxford to have a noisy around the University and Colleges. As many may have read throughout my blogging, I am hoping to continue further study after my year in Paris and want to complete a Masters focusing on Medieval History of Art. As I will be away for the next year, I thought it was probably wise to get started in looking at potential universities so that I get a ‘proper’ feel for the place before applying.

I have only been to Oxford once, and that was when I was only a small child so my memories of the city are quite limited! The city is beautiful. It shares many similarities with York, which I love. One of the main advantages of the university is that it is spread out throughout the entire city. Oxford truly is the University’s city. I am not saying at all that I did not enjoy the centralised nature of York. In fact I found it great – everything is close together so there’s no worry about being late for Seminars/meetings! So this dispersed nature was very new to me!

Our trip to the university included meeting with members of staff in the History of Art and History departments. One thing that I definitely recommend for prospective students, whether that be Post-Graduate or Undergraduate, is to see the place that may become your future home from home and to meet the staff and explore the department. Both members of staff were incredibly friendly and helpful.

As well as meeting departmental staff, I had also arranged to explore a few of the colleges including Jesus, Christ, Trinity and Kellogg. Each are very different, and have all their own unique traits. Similar to York I guess is that there are separate colleges for Graduates only (Such as Kellogg), whereas others are intermixed with both undergraduate and graduates. The good thing about coming from York is that having a similar collegiate system, I wasn’t too confused or thrown off! I think having a look at the potential places that you may live in are imperative to any university visit. Despite the fact that you’re going to an institution to study and learn, the living environment and social side of your time at any university should also weigh in on the decision of where you would like to attend. By visiting potential colleges or halls of residences, this enables you to really in visage whether you could mentally picture yourself fitting in a particular place. If you are turned off by a place, for many reasons (not are all negative, sometimes you just don’t think you would personally suit a particular hall or college) then you know where not to apply etc. Overall, it makes your life a lot easier!

I had a wonderful day roaming around Oxford and getting to know the ins and outs of the university and their teaching. Even if you aren’t thinking about Academia at Oxford, it is definitely worth a visit – there are so many cute tea rooms. Check out some of the photos that I took on my trip there!

 

Jesus College, Oxford
Jesus College, Oxford

 

Lincoln College, Oxford
Lincoln College, Oxford

 

Christ College, Oxford
Christ College, Oxford

 

Christ College, Oxford
Christ College, Oxford – Proud of their rowing success!

 

The Great Hall, Christ College, Oxford
The Great Hall, Christ College, Oxford – Didn’t see Harry Potter any where mind…

 

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J’ai fini!

Graduation

Wow, I cannot quite believe that I am writing this post. It’s official. Yesterday I graduated from York with a First! I am over the moon! It was such a lovely ceremony, and it was great to see everyone before and after. Despite my gown taking every opportunity to try and wriggle its way off me, I managed to survive the graduate fashion. After the graduation ceremony, the History of Art department hosted a lovely get together with some yummy pastries and drinks! From there, me and my family ventured onto the Minster to take some photos by York’s iconic building.

I don’t like the thought of calling myself a graduate now… I am still a student at heart! So now I have a month before I move to Paris for the year, and from there, I plan to begin studying for a Masters in History of Art so do expect more to come from my blog!

I hope that everyone had a wonderful day yesterday – everyone looked so lovely, and it was sad not too see those who could not make the ceremony, you were missed! But alas, we did it!

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Photograph by Ben Selby
History of Art Graduates 2011-2014! (Photograph by Ben Selby)

MET: ‘Radiant Light Stained Glass from Canterbury Cathedral’

Jared (detail), 1178–80, Canterbury Cathedral © Robert Greshoff Photography, courtesy Dean and Chapter of Canterbury
Jared (detail), 1178–80, Canterbury Cathedral © Robert Greshoff Photography, courtesy Dean and Chapter of Canterbury

Between February 25th and May 18th the Cloisters Museum at the MET in New York is hosting an exhibition presenting stained glass from England’s historic Canterbury Cathedral, dating from 1178-80. I find this concept quite unusual I’m not going to lie, as the exhibitions features six Romanesque-period windows that have never left the cathedral since their creation. Bringing stained-glass from the Cathedral to the MET – why when you can just go to Canterbury itself? I guess through bringing the glass over the pond, so to speak, allows more people to see the beauty of Canterbury’s windows. However, I feel that taking such works out of their religious context renders them almost ‘dumb’ in the sense that they’re not functioning in the religious manner that they should be. I guess times have changed so much anyway, that perhaps the religious function of the stained glass windows are becoming more over-looked and less part of their identity. Having studied Canterbury Cathedral last term, I fell in love with it. I have never been there myself, but having seen and learnt about it through images and online 3-D tours I would love to visit.

If anyone is feeling incredibly generous and would like to provide me with tickets (and travel…) to go to the MET to see this exhibition I will love you forever!

For more information and beautiful pictures of the stained glass on show, visit the MET’s website here: http://www.metmuseum.org/en/exhibitions/listings/2014/canterbury-stained-glass

Also, Apollo magazine (who I interned for during the Summer) have created this awesome article showing some of the best examples of stained-glass across the world, check it out! https://www.apollo-magazine.com/stained-glass/