MET: ‘Radiant Light Stained Glass from Canterbury Cathedral’

Jared (detail), 1178–80, Canterbury Cathedral © Robert Greshoff Photography, courtesy Dean and Chapter of Canterbury
Jared (detail), 1178–80, Canterbury Cathedral © Robert Greshoff Photography, courtesy Dean and Chapter of Canterbury

Between February 25th and May 18th the Cloisters Museum at the MET in New York is hosting an exhibition presenting stained glass from England’s historic Canterbury Cathedral, dating from 1178-80. I find this concept quite unusual I’m not going to lie, as the exhibitions features six Romanesque-period windows that have never left the cathedral since their creation. Bringing stained-glass from the Cathedral to the MET – why when you can just go to Canterbury itself? I guess through bringing the glass over the pond, so to speak, allows more people to see the beauty of Canterbury’s windows. However, I feel that taking such works out of their religious context renders them almost ‘dumb’ in the sense that they’re not functioning in the religious manner that they should be. I guess times have changed so much anyway, that perhaps the religious function of the stained glass windows are becoming more over-looked and less part of their identity. Having studied Canterbury Cathedral last term, I fell in love with it. I have never been there myself, but having seen and learnt about it through images and online 3-D tours I would love to visit.

If anyone is feeling incredibly generous and would like to provide me with tickets (and travel…) to go to the MET to see this exhibition I will love you forever!

For more information and beautiful pictures of the stained glass on show, visit the MET’s website here: http://www.metmuseum.org/en/exhibitions/listings/2014/canterbury-stained-glass

Also, Apollo magazine (who I interned for during the Summer) have created this awesome article showing some of the best examples of stained-glass across the world, check it out! https://www.apollo-magazine.com/stained-glass/

Landed in Paris

So after what seems a long day of travelling, we have finally arrived safe and sound in Paris. After heading on an early 9am train to London, we then departed via Eurostar to the French capital. This was my first time of using the Eurostar, and it was much quicker than I had anticipated. Once we got to the hostel, and after we had unpacked our belongings, we met with our two tutors and headed out to the Montmartre area for a lovely dinner with both the groups. I just love Paris, there’s so much to see, and it seems every street you walk down offers you a new and different glimpse of Paris. We headed to the Moulin Rouge after of food, and lets just say that we saw some sights that are youngsters should not be seeing!

Tomorrow ‘The Virgin’s Places’ are off to Notre-Dame Cathedral and the Lourve. But I’m hoping to have the time to quickly go to the Sainte-Chapelle, which is in between these two places. I cannot wait to go to Notre-Dame; having been there quite a few times now, I still feel overwhelmed when I step in and emerge myself in the amazing stained glass – an experience I definitely recommend!

The Moulin Rouge!
The Moulin Rouge!
A photo of some of us outside the The Moulin Rouge!
A photo of some of us outside the The Moulin Rouge!
Some awesome buskers on the Metro
Some awesome buskers on the Metro