The Portobello Road of Paris – Rue Crémieux

The Portobello Road of Paris – Rue Crémieux

If ever there was a single road that could transport one out of the Haussmannian designed world of Paris architecture, and into a completely different sphere, then it would certainly be Rue Crémieux.

Located in the 12th arrondissement, a stone throw away from Gare de Lyon, Rue Crémieux possesses a charm unprecedented within the city. The road is magnificent. Lined with beautifully coloured and decorated terrace houses, the rainbow-like facades could easily have been taken directly from Notting Hill’s very own Portobello Road and placed right bang in the middle of the French capital.

As I was taking in the sheer variety of the houses, a sweet couple pointed out a signage to me, which marked the height in which a flood in 1910 reached – rising to around 6 feet tall.

Rue Crémieux offers a delightful break from the hustle and bustle of Paris. Here you can wander at your own leisure, thanks to the road being pedestrian only, so you don’t have to worry about being run over when taking photos!

 

A hidden gem of the Art Nouveau era: 29 Avenue Rapp, 7th arrondissement

A hidden gem of the Art Nouveau era: 29 Avenue Rapp, 7th arrondissement

This weekend a friend and I were exploring the streets of the 7th arrondissement, when unexpectedly we stumbled upon the gem that is 29 Avenue Rapp. Right in front of us was an amazing Art Nouveau building, and we just had to go and have a closer look!

After some research, I found out that this building is much more famous than I had first imagined. Built in 1901, it was designed by Jules Aimé Lavirotte, a famous French architect whose theatrical designs are typical of the Art Nouveau moment, and today there are just around nine of his buildings left in the whole of Paris. It is a truly unique building, with a stunning façade that had me transfixed. Adorning the façade are beautiful sculptural designs, figurative symbols and exquisite balconies. Unfortunately (or fortunately to the residents), you cannot go inside, so one can only imagine if the interior is as opulent as the exterior.

I also read online that a myth of this building is that it is “a private residence for widowed military spouses”, so it would be interesting to find out if this is true or not!

This really is a hidden gem of Paris, and is well worth a look at if you’re anywhere near this part of the city. So the next time you make a trip to the Eiffel Tower, why not also wonder around the streets in the 7th arrondissement, you’re never too sure what you will find.

In addition to this amazing find, if you venture further down the road and go to Square Rapp, you’re once again provided with a spectacular sight. From this space you can view the back of the building, as well as a fascinating design by Jules Lavirotte on the adjacent wall.

A spontaneous trip up La Tour Eiffel

A spontaneous trip up La Tour Eiffel

My friend and I made a spontaneous decision recently to go and walk up the Eiffel Tower – and why not?! It was a beautiful, albeit cold day – the sun was out, and with the prospect of the next few days being miserable here in Paris, this was the perfect opportunity. To my surprise, I was shocked at how cheap it was for us to walk up to the second level of the tower (which is a lot higher than it sounds!). However, I’m not gonna lie, it was tough walking up all those steps, but once completed, you’re rewarded with amazing views of the city. We also timed our visit really well, as we were able to see the sun setting over Paris. A view that I recommend to everyone!

You can view more photos that I took on my flickr account: https://www.flickr.com/photos/roisingrace/sets/72157648139058404/